Textspeak has become popular among young and old alike.  The speed at which you can respond with simple shortcuts like PLMK (please let me know) mimics a quick conversation.  In case you aren’t up on all the acronymns, here’s a reference to help you decipher tricky ones.  However, unlike an older generation who used full spelling and proper grammar for years before texting, the young are using this language in formal writing as well.

This trend is lending itself towards deteriorating grammar. From Inside School Research Blog on Eduweek.org,

Middle school students who frequently use “tech-speak”—omitting letters to shorten words and using homophone symbols, such as @ for “at” or 2nite for “tonight”—performed worse on a test of basic grammar, according to a new study in New Media & Society.

While you might think that this is just a fun, quick way to send a message, the problem is that the new language isn’t turned off when proper grammar is needed.

“People get creative in terms of trying to express a lot. The economy of expression forces us to take shortcuts with our expression. We know people are texting in a hurry, they are on mobile devices, and so they are making these compromises,” Mr. Sundar said. “It’s not surprising that grammar is taking a back seat in that context. What is worrisome is it somehow seems to transfer over to their offline grammar skills. They are not code-switching offline.”

Some companies are starting to give grammar tests since this doesn’t seem to be a basic skill anymore, and good grammar in writing gives credibility as it shows attention to details. See HERE.  With more and more personal and professional writing being posted on the internet for the world to see (and judge!), you would think people would be more concerned, not less!  JMO  (Just My Opinion)  What do you think about textspeak?  Acceptable or terrible?  Let us know in the comments!

If you would like more information on the Gideon Grammar Program, click HERE.

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